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  • Secondary Release of Cancer Registry Data

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/26/2021

    The purpose of this webinar is to discuss how registries can better understand and support the NCI data sharing requirements for researchers, which for some registries currently pose significant barriers. A significant and related topic, demonstration of data sharing methodologies, will be presented in the future.

    Setting the Stage: Conflicts between NIH data sharing requirements for researchers and registry secondary data release policies--how to improve
    Dennis Deapen, DrPH, MPH
    Past Director, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program
     
    NIH Policies on Data and Resource Sharing
    Nonye Harvey, DrPH
    Health Science Policy Analyst, National Institute of Health
     
    Julia Slutsman, PhD
    Director Genomic Data Sharing Implementation, National Institute of Health
     
    Strength in Numbers: Cancer Research in the NCI Cohort Consortium
    A. Heather Eliassen, Sc.D.
    Associate Professor, Harvard and Brigham & Women's Hospital
     
    The PLCO Cancer Screening Trial: Navigating restrictions to share registry-linked data with the cancer research community
    Eric Miller, PhD
    Epidemiologist, National Cancer Institute
     
    Envisioning the Way Forward...Together
    Castine Clerkin, MPH
    Program Manager Virtual Pooled Registry, NAACCR

    Dennis Deapen, DrPH, MPH

    Epidemiologist

    Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program - USC

    Dennis Deapen is Professor of Preventive Medicine at the USC School of Medicine. He has been Director of the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program since 1988. He received a MPH from Loma Linda University and Doctor of Public Health from UCLA. He has been an epidemiologist since 1977 conducting research in etiology, prevention and survivorship of cancer. His primary interests include cancer among immigrants and pediatric and young adult cancer as well as developing new methodologies for cancer surveillance and research. He has been author or co-author of over 180 peer-reviewed publications. He served as President of the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and a member of the Executive Committee of the International Association of Cancer Registries.

    Nonye Harvey, DrPH, MPh

    Health Science Policy Analyst

    National Institutes of Health

    Dr. Nonye Harvey is a Health Science Policy Analyst in the Genomic Data Sharing Implementation Office housed within the Immediate Office of the Director at the Office of Extramural Research (OER), NIH Office of the Director.  She works across NIH, on trans-NIH groups and committees, to support central coordination and standardizing of systems and processes for optimal implementation of NIH data sharing policies across NIH and the broader scientific community.  She earned her M.P.H. in maternal and child health and international health from the GWU Milken Institute School of Public Health and her Dr.P.H. in leadership in public health from the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health.

    Julia Slutskman, PhD

    Director, Genomic Data Sharing Policy Implementation

    National Institutes of Health

    Dr. Julia Slutsman is a bioethicist and Director of the Genomic Data Sharing Policy Implementation Office in the Office of Extramural Research, NIH.   Her work focusses on supporting coordination of activities necessary for effective implementation of NIH data sharing policies while maintaining research participant confidentiality and data privacy. Dr. Slutsman earned her Ph.D. from the Program in Law, Ethics and Health at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.  She completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the ethics of public health and cancer prevention at the National Cancer Institute.

    Heahter Eliassian, Sc.D.

    Associate Professor

    Harvard and Brigham & Women's Hospital

    Dr. Heather Eliassen is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She is Associate Director of the Channing Division of Network Medicine and Director of the Chronic Disease Epidemiology Unit. Dr. Eliassen is co-PI of two ongoing prospective cohort studies, the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS), founded in 1976 with 121,700 women, and the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHSII), founded in 1989 with 116,400 women. She also is Director of the BWH/Harvard Cohort Biorepository, which houses more than three million biospecimens from 200,000 cohort participants, and co-lead of the Cancer Epidemiology Program at the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. Her research focuses on the etiology of breast cancer, examining associations between lifestyle factors, biomarkers of lifestyle and hormones, and breast cancer risk and progression. She investigates ways in which women may alter their lifestyle to reduce breast cancer risk and improve survival after diagnosis.

    Eric Miller, MS, PhD

    Epidemiologist

    National Cancer Institute

    Eric Miller is an Epidemiologist at the National Cancer Institute. He received his Masters and Doctorate in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Previously, he worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a Senior Research Fellow in the National Center for Health Statistics, as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, and as an Epidemiologist in the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. Eric was also the Epidemiology Manager for the Texas Cancer Registry in the Texas Department of State Health Services.

    Castine Clerkin, MS, CTR

    VPR Program Manager, NAACCR

    Castine Clerkin is the Program Manager for NAACCR’s Virtual Pooled Registry Cancer Linkage System. In this role she oversees all aspects of the project, from pilot linkages to workgroup calls to system development and testing.  Prior to joining NAACCR, Castine was a Program Consultant with CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries for over 7 years and led various special projects, including early case capture of childhood cancer cases.  Castine began her career in cancer surveillance in 2001, working as the epidemiologist and data manager for the Maine Cancer Registry.

  • A Condensed Training for the Rate Stabilizing Tool

    Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/21/2021

    The Rate Stabilizing Tool (RST) is an ArcGIS-based tool that allows users to input their own record-level data to generate reliable, local-level age-standardized measures of chronic disease (e.g., prevalence, incidence, and mortality), or other population health outcomes. Bayesian modelling techniques are used to generate population health estimates and enable users to evaluate statistical uncertainty in the estimates. The RST is especially useful for estimating population health measures when the population, or number of events is small. More information on the RST can be found here: https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/maps/gisx/rst.html

    The Rate Stabilizing Tool (RST) is an ArcGIS-based tool that allows users to input their own record-level data to generate reliable, local-level age-standardized measures of chronic disease (e.g., prevalence, incidence, and mortality), or other population health outcomes. 

    Bayesian modelling techniques are used to generate population health estimates and enable users to evaluate statistical uncertainty in the estimates. The RST is especially useful for estimating population health measures when the population, or number of events is small. 
    More information on the RST can be found here: https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/maps/gisx/rst.html  

    We plan to provide a two part RST training for the April 21st and April 28th NAACCR Talks. During the training we will discuss the objectives and rationale of the RST, review data parameters that are important for use with the RST, and provide opportunities for participants to engage directly with RST.

     

    Session 1: During this first session we will delve into the RST with a focus on inputting local level data into the RST.

    Learning Objectives:

    Introduce the Rate Stabilizing Tool (RST)

    Understand the inputs and outputs of the RST

    Gain experience downloading and installing and running the RST in ArcGIS Pro and or ArcMap

     

    Session 2: In this second session we will review the RST’s output, including how to map and interpret the results. We will also explore strategies for fine tuning. 

    Learning Objectives:

    Develop an understanding of the RST outputs

    Discuss and interpret the RST output, including the evaluation of rate differences and reliability

    Gain experience mapping the RST and symbolizing output

    Joshua Tootoo

    Director

    Geospatial Sciences for the Children's Environmental Health Initiative (CEHI)

    Joshua Tootoo serves as the Director of Training and Geospatial Sciences for the Children’s Environmental Health Initiative (CEHI). HIs research interests include: the application of administrative datasets into analyses examining environmentally driven health disparities; informal project based approaches to education and training for public health/environmental professionals; and the communication of complex data analyses and explanatory narratives to the public, and policy makers through visualization.

    Adam Vaughan

    Epidemiologist

    CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    Adam Vaughan is an epidemiologist in CDC’s Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention. His work focuses on generating and analyzing cardiovascular disease death rates and trends at the local level. He is also interested in ensuring that health departments and communities have access to the data they need to address the rising burden of cardiovascular disease.

     

  • Sassafras! Reading and Writing NAACCR V21 XML using SAS

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/24/2021

    NAACCR has for many years provided SAS tools to the cancer surveillance community for reading and writing NAACCR-standard flat files. With the switch in V21 to only XML format, the toolset needed an upgrade. This webinar will demonstrate how to read and write NAACCR V21 XML files using SAS. It is highly recommended for registry staff and others in the cancer surveillance community who want to interface with NAACCR V21 XML files using SAS.

    NAACCR has for many years provided SAS tools to the cancer surveillance community for reading and writing NAACCR-standard flat files. With the switch in V21 to only XML format, the toolset needed an upgrade. This webinar will demonstrate how to read and write NAACCR V21 XML files using SAS. It is highly recommended for registry staff and others in the cancer surveillance community who want to interface with NAACCR V21 XML files using SAS.

    Christopher Johnson, MPH

    Epidemiologist, Idaho SEER Principal Investigator

    Cancer Data Registry of Idaho

    Chris Johnson is an epidemiologist for the Cancer Data Registry of Idaho and the Principal Investigator for the Idaho SEER registry. He received a Masters of Public Health degree in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina. Mr. Johnson is a past NAACCR Board member and continues to be involved with several NAACCR work groups. A long-term SAS user, Chris has assisted NAACCR with creating SAS tools for reading and writing NAACCR files since way back in the flat file epoch.

  • Advanced Data Collection

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 12/02/2020

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

    Valerie Yoder, BS

    Database Analyst

    Utah Cancer Registry

    Valerie Yoder has a Bachelor’s of Science in Computer Science with a focus on algorithms and data processing. She has worked in the Utah Cancer Registry Informatics department for five years processing, extracting, and analyzing data. She continuously explores process improvements and automation for registry operations and research and has successfully integrated several new and changing data sources. Previously, she worked for many years developing procedures to process and analyze pre-clinical medical imaging data with programming and scientific software.

    Carol Sweeney, PhD

    Director

    Utah Cancer Registry

    Carol Sweeney PhD is a cancer epidemiologist and Professor in the department of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah.  She has over 10 years experience teaching epidemiology and conducting cancer research as a university faculty member.  She has been a director at Utah Cancer Registry from 2014 to the present.

    Joseph Rogers, MS

    Team Lead for Informatics, Data

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention

    Joseph D. Rogers received his B.S. and M.S. in Biology/Chemistry and Information Management respectively from Arizona State University (ASU).  He worked in Arizona for the Maricopa County Health Department as a project manager and data analyst before joining CDC in 1991 (first as a contractor and then as a federal employee in 1997).  During Mr. Rogers’ contracting years at CDC, he worked as a systems analyst on information technology projects, as a project manager, and as a data manager within the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).  When Mr. Rogers joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a federal employee, he initially worked for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) as data manager and later joined the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC)/Cancer Surveillance Branch (CSB) in 1998 as the Team Lead for the Informatics, Data 

    Bozena Morawski, PhD, MPH

    Epidemiologist

    Cancer Data Registry of Idaho

    Bozena Morawski received a PhD in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota and an MPH from the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Morawski is an epidemiologist at the Cancer Data Registry of Idaho. Her research interests include vulnerable and minority populations, infectious disease-associated cancers, and analysis of cancer data by geography. She is a member of the CiNA Editorial Work Group and coauthor of the CiNA Prevalence Volume. 

  • Focus on Brain Tumors

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/04/2020

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

    Trends in Non-Malignant Brain Tumor Rates in the USA during 2004-2017:real or artifact?* 

    Diana Withrow, PhD

    Epidemiologist, National Cancer Institute

    Missing Meningiomas: Are Non-Pathologically Diagnosed Cancers Underreported?

    Dennis Deapen DrPH, MPH

    Epidemiologist, Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program

    Ependymoma, NOS and Anaplastic Ependymoma Incidence and Survival in the United States Varies Widely by Patient and Clinical Charateristics, 2000-2016

    Gino Cioffi, MPH

    Biostatistician, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine & CBTRUS

    Epidemiology of Brainstem High-Grade Gliomas in Children and Adolescents in the United States, 2000-2017

    Nirav Patil, MBBS, MPH

    Senior Biostatistician, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center & CBTRUS

    *At the request of the present, we did not post the slides for this presentation.  

    Diana Withrow, PhD

    Epidemiologist, National Cancer Institue

    Diana Withrow, Ph.D., joined the Radiation Epidemiology Branch (REB) as a postdoctoral fellow in May 2016 and promoted to Research Fellow in June 2018. Dr. Withrow earned her Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Toronto Dalla Lana School of Public Health in 2016. Working with Dr. Loraine Marrett, her doctoral research comprised the first national-level analysis of cancer survival among First Nations and Métis adults in Canada. In 2010, Dr. Withrow earned an M.Sc. in epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Since 2016, Dr. Withrow has worked as a post-doctoral and research fellow in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at teh National Cancer Institute. There, Dr. Withrow’s research interests include socio-demographic and economic disparities in survival and survivorship, the role of therapy on second cancer risk, and the optimal application of survival analysis techniques to these research areas. 

    Dennis Deapen, DrPH, MPH

    Epidemiologist

    Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program - USC

    Dennis Deapen is Professor of Preventive Medicine at the USC School of Medicine. He has been Director of the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program since 1988. He received a MPH from Loma Linda University and Doctor of Public Health from UCLA. He has been an epidemiologist since 1977 conducting research in etiology, prevention and survivorship of cancer. His primary interests include cancer among immigrants and pediatric and young adult cancer as well as developing new methodologies for cancer surveillance and research. He has been author or co-author of over 180 peer-reviewed publications. He served as President of the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and a member of the Executive Committee of the International Association of Cancer Registries.

    Gino Cioffi, MPH

    Biostatistician, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine & CBTRUS

    Gino  Cioffi is a biostatistician at Case Western University School of Medicine. He graduated from Kent State University with a Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology in 2016 and a Master of Public Health in Biostatistics in 2018. He has been involved in CBTRUS since 2018, where he contributes to the preparation of the CBTRUS analytic data files, data analysis, interpretation, manuscripts, reports and data requests.

    Nirav Patil, MBBS, MPH

    Senior Biostatistician; University Hospitals: Cleveland Medical Center & CBTRUS

    Nirav Patil received Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery from Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India in 2010, and a Master of Public Health in Biostatistics from University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas in 2013. Currently, I am working a biostatistician at University Hospitals, Cleveland. Beginning 2019, I am contributing to the preparation of the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) analytic data files, data analysis, interpretation, reports and data requests in addition to preparation of presentations and publications for CBTRUS projects.

  • Social Determinants of Health Part 2

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/28/2020

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

    The importance of examining the intersection of rural-urban status and race/ethnicity in cancer surveillance research: an early-onset colorectal cancer example
    Whitney Zahnd, PhD; University of South Carolina

    Implementation of a Health-Related Social Needs Screening Tool to Inform Cancer Care Improvement Strategies among Diverse Patients in Primary Care Settings
    Jennifer Tsui, PhD, MPH; Assistant Professor, University of Southern California

    Application of Machine Learning and computer vision models to identify green and blue space in remote sensing images
    Pushkar Inamdar, PhD; Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry

    Spatial Econometrics: A framework to understand geographic disparities in cancer outcomes
    Sandi Pruitt, PhD; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

    Whitney Zahnd, PhD

    Research Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina

    Dr. Whitney Zahnd is a research assistant professor with the Rural & Minority Health Research Center in the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina.

    Jennifer Tsui, PhD

    Associate Professor, University of Southern California

    Jennifer Tsui is an Associate Professor at the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine and a member of the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. She is a health services researcher with a focus on disparities in cancer care delivery and cancer outcomes, particularly among racial/ethnic minority and low-income populations.  Dr. (SWAY) Tsui’s research utilizes cancer registry information, health care claims, population-based surveys, and geographic/spatial data to understand multilevel influences on patterns of care and cancer care quality for diverse populations. Her other area of research focuses on HPV vaccination and the implementation of evidence-based strategies to increase uptake in safety-net health care settings. 

    Pushkar Inamdar, PhD

    Data Scientist, University of California, San Francisco

    Dr. Pushkar Inamdar is a Data Scientist in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and also a part of the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). His Ph.D. is in the field of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. His previous research experience is in the Geospatial Sciences, including an application of geostatistics in understanding temporal-spatial patterns. Since, joining UCSF, he has gained experience in characterizing neighborhood attributes for epidemiologic studies, including cohort and electronic health records studies as well as conducting geospatial analyses (e.g., spatial autocorrelation, proximity analysis, data wrangling, kriging, geocoding, remote sensing image analysis). He is applying more advanced concepts like deep learning to perform remote sensing data analysis for the neighborhood characterization, and application of machine learning on geospatial datasets to understand underlying patterns of health risk factors and outcomes.

    Sandi Pruitt, PhD, MPH

    Associate Professor, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

    Sandi L. Pruitt, PhD MPH, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Population and Data Sciences at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Pruitt uses cancer registry data, electronic health record data, and neighborhood data to better understand geographic, socioeconomic, and racial/ethnic disparities in cancer behaviors and outcomes.

  • Social Determinants of Health Part 1

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/21/2020

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

    Multilevel social stressors and prostate cancer disparities in African American men 

    Scarlett Gomez, PhD, MPH; Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry

    Socioeconomic Disparities in Colon Cancer Survival: Revisiting Neighborhood Poverty using Residential Histories

    Daniel Wiese, Doctoral Student, Temple University 

    Using cancer registries to understand sexual minorities’ cancer survivorship 

    Ulrike Boehmer, PhD; Boston University School of Public Health

    Ethnic Enclaves in Cancer Surveillance and Registry-Based Research among Asian American and Hispanic populations

    Salma Shariff-Marco, PhD, MPH; University of California, San Francisco

    Scarlett Lin Gomez, PhD

    Research Scientist & Director, Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry

    Scarlett Lin Gomez, M.P.H. and Ph.D. in Epidemiology, is Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and a member of the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, at the University of California, San Francisco. She is Director of the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry, a participant in the NCI SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, End Results) program and the California Cancer Registry.  Her research focuses primarily on cancer health disparities and aims to understand the multilevel drivers of those disparities. 

    Daniel Wiese

    Doctoral Student, Temple University

    DanielWiese is a doctoral student in the department of geography and urban studies atTemple University. Currently he is working on his dissertation undersupervision of Dr. Kevin Henry, and is expected to graduate in May 2021. Hisbackground is in remote sensing and GIS-based spatial modeling. The mainresearch interests include the understanding of geographic disparities incancer incidence and mortality in relation to socio-spatial mobility andneighborhood effects.

    Ulrike Boehmer, PhD

    Associate Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

    Ulrike Boehmer, PhD is an Associate Professor of Community Health Sciences at Boston University School of Public Health. Dr. Boehmer received her Ph.D. and M.A. in Sociology from Boston College. Dr. Boehmer’s research interests are in the areas of health disparities, LGBT health, and cancer prevention and control. She is particularly known for her work on LGBT cancer survivorship. Dr. Boehmer is recognized as a leader in LGBT health, especially in the context of cancer. She edited together with Dr. Elk the first book on Cancer and the LGBT population entitled, Cancer and the LGBT Community: Unique perspectives from Risk to Survivorship. She served on the Federal Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women, serves on Scientific Advisory Committees for various NIH grants that focus on LGBT health, and is the Associate Editor of the Journal LGBT Health.

    Salma Shariff-Maro, PhD, MPH

    Social and Behavioral Scientist, University of California, San Francisco

    Salma Shariff-Marco, PhD, MPH is a social and behavioral scientist with a research portfolio focused on understanding the role of social determinants of health in shaping and perpetuating health disparities. One main area of her research is on place and health, with studies evaluating how neighborhood characteristics (e.g., social, built, and physical environment attributes) and geographic variation may shape cancer-related health behaviors and outcomes across the cancer continuum. In addition, her research includes efforts to better characterize neighborhoods for population health studies (neighborhood archetypes, virtual audits with Google Street View).

  • Focus On Survival

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/07/2020

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

    Impact of Neighborhood on Survival Among Young Patients with Acute Leukemia in California

    Lena Winestone, MD, MS; UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital

     

    Comprehensive Cancer Survival by Socioeconomic Status in Ontario, Canada, 2006-2011

    Ying Wang, MSc; Cancer Care Ontario | Ontario Health

     

    Residential Mobility among adult cancer survivor in the United States, An Analysis of the 2013-2018 National Health Interview Survey

    Bian Liu. PhD; Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

     

    Detailed Melanoma Anatomic Site as predictor or “Upstaging” Treatment

    Myles Cockburn, PhD; Colorado School of Public Health

     

    Population-Based, Age-specific Characteristics of Survival for Melanoma Diagnosed in California

    Katherine Wojcik, PhD; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

    Lena Winestone, MD, MS

    Pediatric Hematologist-oncologist, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital

    Dr.Lena Winestoneis a pediatric blood and bone marrow transplant specialist with a stronginterest in caring for children with high-risk or relapsed leukemia orlymphoma. She has a focus on using novel immunotherapies – treatments thatimprove the body's own ability to fight cancer – so that patients withtherapy-resistant leukemia can receive successful transplants. Winestone'sresearch explores racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in children'saccess to leukemia treatment, including bone marrow transplant, and in theiroutcomes. Her top priority is ensuring that all children can get the bestpossible treatment as early as possible. Afterearning a master's degree in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania, Winestoneearned her medical degree at Stanford University School of Medicine. She thencompleted a residency in pediatrics at Lucile Packard Children's HospitalStanford and a fellowship in pediatric hematology and oncology at theChildren's Hospital of Philadelphia. She also has a master's degree in healthpolicy research from the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School ofMedicine.

    Ying Wang, MSc

    Biostatistician, Cancer Care Ontario | Ontario Health

    Ying Wang holds a Master degree in Statistics from McMaster University and has more than 10 years of experience in statistical analysis and modeling within the health care field. Currently, she works as a Biostatistician /Senior Research Associate at Cancer Care Ontario | Ontario Health. Her expertise includes regression modeling, survival analyses, projections, longitudinal analysis and multi-level modeling. Ying’s work with her colleagues has been published in different journals such as Canadian Journal of Public Health and American Journal of Epidemiology.

    Bian Liu, PhD

    Environmental Health and Cancer Epidemiologist, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

    Dr. Bian Liu is an environmental health and cancer epidemiologist.  She studies how the interplay between the places where people live throughout their lives and factors at the personal, institutional, and neighborhood level impacts their health, behavior, and healthcare utilization.  She applies statistical approaches to large databases to uncover geospatial and disparity patterns in exposures and health outcomes. She investigates the health effects of environmental and occupational exposures under normal conditions, as well as in natural/man-made disaster situations. 

    Myles Cockburn, PHd

    Professor, University of Southern California

    Dr. Cockburn is a coffee snob, a keen cyclist and runner, and probably drinks too much scotch.  In his spare time, he is the Scientific Director of the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program, runs the Cancer Control Program of the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, and is a Professor of Preventive Medicine and Spatial Sciences at USC.  He also runs a PhD program in epidemiology if you’re interested in a career in academia, and like working 70 hours a week on a barista’s salary.  And yes, he was at the University of Colorado for a few years, but they ran out of scotch, so he’s back at USC.

    Katherine Wojcick, PhD

    Epidemiologist, NCI T32 postdoctoral scholar, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

    Dr. Katherine Wojcik is an epidemiologist and NCI T32 postdoctoral scholar, who is interested in cancer affecting children and young people, primarily the understudied group of adolescents and young adults (AYAs), defined as persons diagnosed with cancer at 15-39 years of age. I have expertise in conducting population-based, cancer-registry studies of AYA cancers, including melanoma, and have been working in public health research for over 10 years. 

  • Operations to Enhance Data Use and Research

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/30/2020

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

    The Systematic Application of Case Suppression Criteria to Spatial Analysis of Cancer Data

    Laura Thompson, MA, University of Southern California

     

    Using an Environmental Burden Index when Modeling Cancer Incidence in Idaho – 2008-2017

    Bozena Morawski, PhD, MPH; Cancer Data Registry of Idaho

     

    Feasibility of Ultra-rapid Reporting of Mesothelioma for Public Health Intervention

    Dennis Deapen, DrPH, MPH; Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program

     

    Cancer Registry Data Linkage of Electronic Health Record Data from ASVO’s CancerLinQ: Evaluation of Advantages, Limitations, and Lessons Learned

    Amanda Kahl, MPH; State Health Registry of Iowa

    Laura Thompson, MA

    Program Analyst, University of Southern California, Department of Preventative Medicine

    Laura Thompson is a Programmer Analyst at the University of Southern California, Department of Preventive Medicine. She has an MA in Geography and primarily supports the department with geographic data analysis aimed at understanding spatial uncertainty in cancer control. Her ongoing work involves the application of novel spatial analysis methods in an exploration of the effects of residential ambient pesticide exposure on cancer incidence. Laura also supports research related to understanding spatial differences in cancer diagnosis, burden and treatment outcomes.

    Bozena Morawski, PhD, MPH

    Epidemiologist

    Cancer Data Registry of Idaho

    Bozena Morawski received a PhD in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota and an MPH from the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Morawski is an epidemiologist at the Cancer Data Registry of Idaho. Her research interests include vulnerable and minority populations, infectious disease-associated cancers, and analysis of cancer data by geography. She is a member of the CiNA Editorial Work Group and coauthor of the CiNA Prevalence Volume. 

    Dennis Deapen, DrPH, MPH

    Epidemiologist

    Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program - USC

    Dennis Deapen is Professor of Preventive Medicine at the USC School of Medicine. He has been Director of the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program since 1988. He received a MPH from Loma Linda University and Doctor of Public Health from UCLA. He has been an epidemiologist since 1977 conducting research in etiology, prevention and survivorship of cancer. His primary interests include cancer among immigrants and pediatric and young adult cancer as well as developing new methodologies for cancer surveillance and research. He has been author or co-author of over 180 peer-reviewed publications. He served as President of the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and a member of the Executive Committee of the International Association of Cancer Registries.

    Amanda Kahl, MPH

    Research Specialist, State Health Registry of Iowa

    Amanda Kahl is an epidemiologist and researcher at the Iowa Cancer Registry. who has conducted studies of data quality and completeness of cancer registry data, assessed the quality of data linkages with registry data, and examined the associations between viral infections and cancer in Iowa.

  • Utility, Strengths, and Limitations of Cancer Registry Data For Firefighter Cancer Research

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/09/2020

    Research has demonstrated that firefighters are routinely exposed to many known and suspected human carcinogens including brominated flame retardants, PAHs, VOCs, benzene, asbestos and PFAS. While there is strong evidence that firefighters have higher risk for certain types of cancer compared to the general population, many details about cancer risk and risk factors remain poorly understood and subgroups of firefighters; including women, minorities, and volunteers, are understudied. Evidence for excess risk of cancer comes largely from historical cohort studies with limited exposure information and often lack data on important potential confounding factors, such as smoking and alcohol use. And because the cohorts are identified mainly through employment related records, these studies may be susceptible to downward bias from healthy worker effects. These studies also e exclude the majority of firefighters, who are volunteer not career firefighters. The aims of this session are to understand best practices for use of cancer registry data to this field of study, describe data access challenges and approaches, address approaches to improve exposure assessment and minimize impact of healthy worker effects, as well as become familiar with the development of the new National Firefighter Registry that aims to address the above gaps in information on understudied subgroups, such as woman and minorities, as well as volunteer and wildfire firefighters.

    Research has demonstrated that firefighters are routinely exposed to many known and suspected human carcinogens including brominated flame retardants, PAHs, VOCs, benzene, asbestos and PFAS. While there is strong evidence that firefighters have higher risk for certain types of cancer compared to the general population, many details about cancer risk and risk factors remain poorly understood and subgroups of firefighters; including women, minorities, and volunteers, are understudied.

    Evidence for excess risk of cancer comes largely from historical cohort studies with limited exposure information and often lack data on important potential confounding factors, such as smoking and alcohol use. And because the cohorts are identified mainly through employment related records, these studies may be susceptible to downward bias from healthy worker effects. These studies also e exclude the majority of firefighters, who are volunteer not career firefighters.  

    The aims of this session are to understand best practices for use of cancer registry data to this field of study, describe data access challenges and approaches, address approaches to improve exposure assessment and minimize impact of healthy worker effects, as well as become familiar with the development of the new National Firefighter Registry that aims to address the above gaps in information on understudied subgroups, such as woman and minorities, as well as volunteer and wildfire firefighters.

    Rachel Zeig-Owens, DrPh, MPH

    Director of Epidemiology, World Trade Center Health Program at the FDCNY

    Dr. Rachel Zeyeg-Owens is the Director of Epidemiology for the World Trade Center Health Program at the Fire Department of the City of New York. She is also a Research Assistant Professor in department of Epidemiology and Population Health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She received her DrPH from CUNY and her MPH from Columbia.

    Ankura Singh, MPH

    Epidemiologist, Fire Department of the City of New York

    Ankura Singh is an Epidemiologist  with the Fire Department of the City of New York since February 2016  She received her MPH from Boston University.  

    Gerald Harris, PhD

    Supervising Research Scientist, New Jersey State Cancer Registry

    Dr. Gerald Harris is a Supervising Research Scientist at the New Jersey State Cancer Registry. His primary responsibility is to manage the data linkage studies that the Registry performs. He has extensive experience in environmental epidemiology and statistics. He started his career at the Dept. of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory as a statistician. Dr. Harris then worked at the Environmental Epidemiology and Statistics group at the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute. He is now at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

    David Lee, PhD

    Project Director, Florida Cancer Data System

    Dr. David Lee is a chronic disease epidemiologist with long standing research interests in the areas of occupational health, tobacco and cancer control.  He is currently the Project Director of the Florida Cancer Data System and is Principal Investigator of the data linkage study under the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Firefighters Cancer Initiative at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

    Miriam Siegel

    Lead Epidemiologist, National Firefighter Registry, NIOSH

    Dr. Miriam Siegel, DrPH, MPH, is Lead Epidemiologist for the National Firefighter Registry at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). She completed her doctorate in occupational epidemiology at the University of Kentucky in 2016. Dr. Siegel joined NIOSH in 2017 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer where she worked on a range of research topics related to occupational reproductive health, workplace violence, firefighter fatality surveillance, and wildland firefighter safety and health. She now works as part of a team developing a national registry of firefighters to evaluate cancer incidence and risk factors within the U.S. fire service.