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Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
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  • Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/01/2022

    This 3-hour class will address coding dilemmas identified through quality control of registry data and present solutions with rationale for determining the number of primary tumors using the Solid Tumor Rules; assigning ICD-O-3 topography and histology codes using the ICD-O-3 Manual and Solid Tumor Rules; completing the stage of disease data items using AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, 8th Edition and Summary Stage 2020; and completing treatment data items as required by all standard setters.

    This 3-hour class will address coding dilemmas identified through quality control of registry data and present solutions with rationale for determining the number of primary tumors using the Solid Tumor Rules; assigning ICD-O-3 topography and histology codes using the ICD-O-3 Manual and Solid Tumor Rules; completing the stage of disease data items using AJCC Cancer Staging Manual, 8th Edition and Summary Stage 2020; and completing treatment data items as required by all standard setters.
  • Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/04/2022

    Correct and consistent cancer counts and quality data are critical to the mission of the cancer registry. To achieve these goals registrars must apply the solid tumor rules uniformly. During this webinar we will review the structure and format of the Solid Tumor Manual

    Correct and consistent cancer counts and quality data are critical to the mission of the cancer registry. To achieve these goals registrars must apply the solid tumor rules uniformly. During this webinar we will review the structure and format of the Solid Tumor Manual

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/07/2022

    This 3-hour class will cover CoC standards compliance as registries prepare for the future. The focus will include ways to track data in your program to meet several of the new CoC standards. A special emphasis will be placed on Standard 6.4: RCRS & Concurrent Abstracting.

    This 3-hour class will cover CoC standards compliance as registries prepare for the future. The focus will include ways to track data in your program to meet several of the new CoC standards. A special emphasis will be placed on Standard 6.4: RCRS & Concurrent Abstracting.
  • Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/02/2022

    This 3-hour class will present the following information for central nervous system, anatomical information needed to abstract and code the cases; how to determine the number of primary tumors; how to code topography and histology; how to code the stage data items; and the treatments and how to code them.

    This 3-hour class will present the following information for central nervous system, anatomical information needed to abstract and code the cases; how to determine the number of primary tumors; how to code topography and histology; how to code the stage data items; and the treatments and how to code them.
  • Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/05/2022

    This 3-hour class will present the following information for colon: anatomical information needed to abstract and code the cases; how to determine the number of primary tumors; how to code topography and histology; how to code the stage data items; and the treatments and how to code them.

    This 3-hour class will present the following information for colon: anatomical information needed to abstract and code the cases; how to determine the number of primary tumors; how to code topography and histology; how to code the stage data items; and the treatments and how to code them.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/02/2022

    Identifying geospatial cancer survival disparities is critical to focus interventions and prioritize efforts with limited resources. Incorporating residential mobility into spatial models may result in different geographic patterns of survival compared with the standard approach using a single location based on the patient's residence at the time of diagnosis. In the presentation, we describe the process of linking residential histories from LexisNexis to New Jersey colon cancer cases and describe results from our geospatial analysis of colon cancer survival that included residential histories.

    Identifying geospatial cancer survival disparities is critical to focus interventions and prioritize efforts with limited resources. Incorporating residential mobility into spatial models may result in different geographic patterns of survival compared with the standard approach using a single location based on the patient's residence at the time of diagnosis. In the presentation, we describe the process of linking residential histories from LexisNexis to New Jersey colon cancer cases and describe results from our geospatial analysis of colon cancer survival that included residential histories.  


    Jonathan Simkin, MPH

    Scientific Director

    British Columbia Cancer Registry, BC Cancer, Provincial Health Services Authority

    Jonathan Simkin is the Scientific Director of the British Columbia (BC) Cancer Registry, BC Cancer, Provincial Health Services Authority located in Vancouver, BC, Canada. He completed a Master’s of Public Health at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and is currently a PhD Candidate at the School of Population and Public Health, UBC. His research focuses on applications of geospatial methods to cancer surveillance and population oncology research. Jonathan has worked at cancer registries since 2015, previously working with the Yukon Cancer Registry as a Cancer Epidemiologist.

    Kevin Henry, PhD, MA

    Associate Professor

    Temple University

    KevinHenry is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and UrbanStudies at Temple University and a member of Fox Chase Cancer Center’s CancerPrevention and Control program. He is a medical geographer, and his researchand teaching focus on describing and understanding place-based and geographicdisparities in health and disease, with a specific emphasis on appliedgeographic methods and the role geographic factors play in cancer outcomes andprevention.  https://medicalgeography.us/ 

    Daniel Wiese, PhD

    Senior Scientist, Adjunct Assistant Professor

    American Cancer Society; Temple University

    Daniel Wiese, PhD is a senior scientist at the American Cancer Society and adjunct assistant professor at Temple University. He is a medical geographer with main research focus on geographic cancer disparities. His expertise is in the application of spatial analytic tools using GIS and remote sensing modeling techniques. He has conducted research on how social and environmental neighborhood factors may influence individual and populational health outcomes,   including several cancer types. 

  • Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/25/2022

    This “How To” webinar will introduce participants to newly developed resources to support spatial analysis and health equity research. These resources, which include census tract-level population estimates for the United States, are freely available and developed specifically for using in cancer surveillance. This webinar addresses how to calculate cancer rates in SEER*Stat by tract-level based social measure, such as NAACCR Poverty Code. How to handle the incidence data, census tract-level population estimates, and the area-based social measures data will be covered step by step. This webinar is appropriate for registry analysts, academic researchers, and anyone interested in the use of cancer registry data.

    This “How To” webinar will introduce participants to newly developed resources to support spatial analysis and health equity research. These resources, which include census tract-level population estimates for the United States, are freely available and developed specifically for using in cancer surveillance. This webinar addresses how to calculate cancer rates in SEER*Stat by tract-level based social measure, such as NAACCR Poverty Code.

    How to handle the incidence data, census tract-level population estimates, and the area-based social measures data will be covered step by step.

    In the "and then some!" portion of this talk we will demonstrate how to calculate rates by census tract, Cancer Reporting Zones, CDC Sub-County Geographic Area, and multiple area-based social measures with your registry data in SEER*Stat. We encourage staff who work on cancer cluster concerns and other small area rate calculations attend. We particularly encourage staff who run SEER*Prep to attend, as we will detail how to include the census tract population estimates along with your registry data in SEER*Prep. 

    This webinar is appropriate for registry analysts, academic researchers, and anyone interested in the use of cancer registry data. 

    Christopher Johnson, MPH

    Epidemiologist, Idaho SEER Principal Investigator

    Cancer Data Registry of Idaho

    Chris Johnson has worked as an epidemiologist for the Cancer Data Registry of Idaho, a program of the Idaho Hospital Association, since 1998. Mr. Johnson received a Master of Public Health degree in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina, a long time ago. He has been involved with NAACCR since early in his career as a cancer epidemiologist, and his main contributions to NAACCR today are on the Virtual Pooled Registry Cancer Linkage System and as lead editor for the NAACCR Cancer in North America (CiNA) survival and prevalence volumes.

    Steve Scoppa, BS

    Senior Systems Analyst,

    Information Management Services

    Steve Scoppa, Senior Systems Analyst at Information Management Services focuses on the design and implementation of biomedical computer systems.  He has extensive experience and expertise in systems design and object-oriented programming, focusing mainly on desktop applications. Mr. Scoppa is a lead developer and designer of several systems, including the SEER*Stat, SEER*Prep, and HD*Calc software.  Mr Scoppa holds a BS in Computer Science from James Madison University.  He has been with IMS since 1990.

    Todd Gibson, BS

    Senior Systems Analyst

    Information Management Services, Inc

    James ‘Todd’ Gibson is a Senior Systems Analyst at Information Management Services, Inc.  His work at IMS focuses on data management of biomedical data.  He has extensive experience and expertise with Census Bureau’s population data, The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) mortality data and the Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey (TUS-CPS).  For the population project, he is involved in various aspects of the project including developing the county and census tract level attribute files, creating population denominator files and providing support to users of the files.  Mr. Gibson holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics and Computer Science from Waynesburg College.  He has been with IMS since 1989.

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/14/2022

    This 3-hour class will present the following information for hematopoietic and lymphocytic neoplasms: anatomical information needed to abstract and code the cases; how to determine the number of primary tumors; how to code topography and histology; how to code the stage data items; and coding treatment data items.

    This 3-hour class will present the following information for hematopoietic and lymphocytic neoplasms: anatomical information needed to abstract and code the cases; how to determine the number of primary tumors; how to code topography and histology; how to code the stage data items; and coding treatment data items.
  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/07/2022

    This NAACCR Talk will present 3 of the Phase II Pilot cohort studies that are linking with registry data via the VPR-CLS. Study updates as well as researchers’ perspective on using the VPR-CLS will be presented. The three studies include the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, the Transplant Cancer Match Study, and the Cohort Cancer Follow-up Study.

    This NAACCR Talk will present 3 of the Phase II Pilot cohort studies that are linking with registry data via the VPR-CLS. Study updates as well as researchers’ perspective on using the VPR-CLS will be presented. The three studies include the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, the Transplant Cancer Match Study, and the Cohort Cancer Follow-up Study.

     

    Presenters:

    Surveillance Innovations in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Greg Armstrong, MD. MSCE

    Faculty, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

     

    VPR Linkage for the Transplant Cancer Match Study

    Eric Engels; MD, MPH

    Senior Investigator, NCI/DCEG

     

    Updates from Cohort Cancer Registry Follow Up Study

    Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH

    Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

    Greg Armstrong, MD MSCE

    Member, Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control

    St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

    Greg Armstrong MD, MSCE, joined the Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in 2006. Dr. Armstrong is the Principal Investigator of the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCCS). The CCSS is a multi-institutional, collaborative cohort study initiated in 1994, which has successfully established and followed a cohort of five-year survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed between 1970-1999 and a sibling comparison group. The cohort, derived through 31 original participating clinical centers, has collected detailed information on cancer diagnosis and therapy received along with health-related long-term outcomes. His research has provided novel identification of a reduction in late mortality among survivors of childhood cancer from more recent eras attributable to reduced treatment exposure, extending the lifespan of these survivors (NEJM 2016). He has been continuously funded by NCI since 2010.

    Eric Engles, MD, MPH

    Senior Investigator

    National Cancer Institute

    Dr. Engels earned a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Virginia in 1987 and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1991. From 1991 to 1994, he trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Subsequently, Dr. Engels received clinical training in infectious diseases and an M.P.H. at Tufts University School of Medicine. He joined the NCI Viral Epidemiology Branch (later the Infections and Immunoepidemiology Branch (IIB)) in 1998 as a senior staff fellow, became an investigator in 2000, and was tenured in 2007. He was appointed Chief of the Infections and Immuneopidermiology Branch in 2017. Dr. Engels holds an adjunct faculty appointment in the Department of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.. 

    Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH

    Professor of Medicine

    Harvard Medical School

    Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH earned his MD from New York University School of Medicine and his MPH and DrPH from Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Stampfer’s research program is broadly concerned with the etiology of chronic diseases, with particular focus on nutrition and cancer. Dr. Stampfer is closely involved in four large prospective cohort studies: Nurses’ Health Study I (N = 121,700) – Principal Investigator; Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (N = 51,259) – Founding co-Investigator; Physicians’ Health Studies I and II (N = 22,071) – Founding co-Investigator; Nurses’ Health Study II (N = 116,678) – Founding co-Investigator. In addition, Dr. Stampfer leads several other NIH-funded projects, and is Principal Investigator of two NIH training programs that support pre-doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows.

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/03/2022

    This 3-hour class will involve completing multiple quizzes that focus on core concepts of casefinding and abstracting. There will be minimal lecture.

    This 3-hour class will involve completing multiple quizzes that focus on core concepts of casefinding and abstracting. There will be minimal lecture.