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  • Getting Ready for NAACCR XML in 2020

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/27/2019

    Starting in 2020, after nearly 30 years of defining a fixed width format for data exchange, NAACCR will be transitioning Volume II of the NAACCR Data Standards and Data Dictionary to an XML based format. This webinar will highlight the readiness of registry software vendors for this important new data standard, as well as explaining the rich set of software resources and technical expertise available to the NAACCR community to make sure this transition to XML is as seamless as possible. This webinar will include presentations from NPCR, SEER, and the NAACCR XML Data Exchange Workgroup. If you are interested in the impact that NAACCR XML will have on your registry or organization and you would like to know the latest news on the XML transition, be sure to attend this webinar.

    Starting in 2020, after nearly 30 years of defining a fixed width format for data exchange, NAACCR will be transitioning Volume II of the NAACCR Data Standards and Data Dictionary to an XML based format. This webinar will highlight the readiness of registry software vendors for this important new data standard, as well as explaining the rich set of software resources and technical expertise available to the NAACCR community to make sure this transition to XML is as seamless as possible. This webinar will include presentations from NPCR, SEER, and the NAACCR XML Data Exchange Workgroup. If you are interested in the impact that NAACCR XML will have on your registry or organization and you would like to know the latest news on the XML transition, be sure to attend this webinar.

    NAACCR XML Resources are publicly available online at: https://github.com/imsweb/naaccr-xml/wiki

    Isaac Hands

    Lead Software Architect, Kentucky Cancer Registry

    Isaac Hands leads the software development efforts of the Kentucky Cancer Registry and assist in managing informatics operations, providing technical leadership, and designing data infrastructure at the Kentucky Cancer Registry and the UK Markey Cancer Center Research Informatics Core. Mr. Hands oversees the software development, database and network operations, and customer support of the state-wide cancer patient data management system in use at all hospital facilities in KY and the statewide SEER/NPCR central cancer registry software.

    Joseph D Rogers

    Team Lead IDSAT, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control

    Joseph D. Rogers received his B.S. and M.S. in Biology/Chemistry and Information Management respectively from Arizona State University (ASU).  He worked in Arizona for the Maricopa County Health Department as a project manager and data analyst before joining CDC in 1991 (first as a contractor and then as a federal employee in 1997).  During Mr. Rogers’ contracting years at CDC, he worked as a systems analyst on information technology projects, as a project manager, and as a data manager within the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).  When Mr. Rogers joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a federal employee, he initially worked for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) as data manager and later joined the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC)/Cancer Surveillance Branch (CSB) in 1998 as the Team Lead for the Informatics, Data Science, and Applications Team (IDSAT).  In this capacity, Mr. Rogers is responsible for the leadership and management of the DCPC cancer informatics/data science projects and the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) application development/support.   Mr. Rogers has a keen interest in working with NPCR Programs to enhance their use of cancer registry data. He is particularly interested using cancer informatics and process automation to achieve more complete, timely, and accurate cancer incidence data. 

    Fabian Depry

    Senior Systems Analyst

    Fabian Depry, focuses on the design and implementation of biomedical computer systems.  He has extensive experience and expertise in systems design and object-oriented programming, focusing mainly on Java Desktop and Web applications. Mr. Depry is a lead developer and designer on the SEER*DMS project.  He also designed and developed the SEER Abstracting tool, the SEER*Edits Submission tool and the SEER Data Viewer tool.  Mr Depry holds a BS in Computer Science from Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Belgium and a MS in Computer Science from Hood College, Frederick.  He has been with IMS since 2003.

    Jeff Reed

    Senior Database Administrator for the NCDB database

    Jeff Reed has over 30 years in Relational Database Technology and currently overseas the loading of NAACCR data into the COC’s NCDB database.  Jeff joined the XML workgroup only recently but has managed to put together a nice prototype to help showcase the integration of the XML data format utilizing the CDC’s XML.DLL to load the data into the NCDB database that he will be sharing with us today.   

  • PREPARING YOUR INCIDENCE DATA TO BE USED IN SEER*STAT

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    SEER*Stat is a powerful statistical application that is available free of charge from the US National Cancer Institute and provides a mechanism for the analysis of population-based cancer registry data. It has modules for the analysis and reporting of the four most common cancer-related metrics: incidence, survival, prevalence, and mortality.

    SEER*Stat for Global Cancer Registry Data

    SEER*Stat is a powerful statistical application that is available free of charge from the US National Cancer Institute and provides a mechanism for the analysis of population-based cancer registry data. It has modules for the analysis and reporting of the four most common cancer-related metrics: incidence, survival, prevalence, and mortality.

    SEER*Prep is a software that converts text data files to the format required by SEER*Stat. The objective of these series of webinars is to facilitate the use of SEER*Stat software for data that are not in accordance with the NAACCR format. Specifically, we will make use of a more generic, simplified format that complies with data usually available from cancer registries across the world, thus facilitating the use of SEER*prep and SEER*Stat. New variables in this global format include CI5 groupings and Essential TNM. These features will facilitate analysis and reporting of population-based cancer data in a standard format.

    In these series of webinars, participants will be guided on a step-by-step fashion in the process of how to use SEER*Prep to generate a SEER*Stat database for analysis of incidence (webinar 1) and mortality (webinar 2) data, using the new global format. The demonstration will be done using real data. Future webinars will focus on how to use SEER*Stat more in-depth (dates TBD).

    By the end of each of the first 2 webinars participants should be able to:

    • -Define a Directory to save user-defined data, reports and database description files
    • -Understand each variable in SEER*Prep’s database description file
    • -Make use of user-defined variables
    • -Convert text data into fixed length format using FixLen
    • -Generate a SEER*Stat database using SEER*Prep
    • -Check and, if necessary, correct any variable in the original file using the report generated by SEER*Prep
    • -Configure file locations in SEER*Stat
    • -Generate frequencies and rates (age-specific, crude, age-standardized) in SEER*Stat
    • -Generate standard reports (e.g., CI5 format)
    • -Create and edit variables using the dictionary in SEER*Stat
  • Producing Cancer Statistics at the Census Tract Level: A Louisiana Story

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/14/2018

    During the 2017 Louisiana Legislative Session, a new law was signed requiring that the Louisiana Tumor Registry (LTR) produce and release cancer incidence counts and rates at the census tract level. Previously, cancer statistics could be released to the public at the parish (county) level. To comply with this law, the LTR convened a team, including experts from NCI-SEER and IMS, to develop the appropriate methodology to produce incidence rates at the census tract level while ensuring rate stability and patient confidentiality. The objective of this presentation is to describe the LTR's experience with identifying the appropriate population source, selecting the time period for the analysis, and producing reliable cancer statistics at the census tract level, as well as to share a summary of the results.

    During the 2017 Louisiana Legislative Session, a new law was signed requiring that the Louisiana Tumor Registry (LTR) produce and release cancer incidence counts and rates at the census tract level. Previously, cancer statistics could be released to the public at the parish (county) level. To comply with this law, the LTR convened a team, including experts from NCI-SEER and IMS, to develop the appropriate methodology to produce incidence rates at the census tract level while ensuring rate stability and patient confidentiality. The objective of this presentation is to describe the LTR's experience with identifying the appropriate population source, selecting the time period for the analysis, and producing reliable cancer statistics at the census tract level, as well as to share a summary of the results.

  • Setting up NCD Surveillance in an island context: Lessons from the Pacific

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Setting up NCD Surveillance in an island context: Lessons from the Pacific

    Setting up NCD Surveillance in an island context: Lessons from the Pacific

    Please click "Handouts" tab above to access material.

  • International Registry Review Questionnaire

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    International Registry Review Questionnaire

    International Registry Review Questionnaire

  • Regional Workshop On Using Cancer Registry Data to Inform Cancer Prevention and Control Policy/Research

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Regional Workshop On Using Cancer Registry Data to Inform Cancer Prevention and Control Policy/Research

    This session will focus on Regional Workshop On Using Cancer Registry Data to Inform Cancer Prevention and Control Policy/Research.

    Brenda Edwards

    Senior Advisor for Cancer Surveillance

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP's Associate Director from 1990-2011. She has been involved in cancer prevention and control since its formative days early in the 1980s. Dr. Edwards' research has focused on the full spectrum of cancer surveillance research, including risk factors, patterns of care, behavioral studies and survivorship, statistical methodology, and analytic studies.

    Under her leadership, NCI's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program has become an important resource for monitoring the nation's cancer burden and for measuring progress in cancer control. Dr. Edwards has played a major role in preparing and disseminating the “Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer."

    Dr. Edwards has received numerous awards, including the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries Calum S. Muir Memorial Award, in recognition for her work in cancer surveillance and registration. She has co-authored more than 100 peer-reviewed publications.

  • Survey Course: Understanding Population-Based Cancer Registries Course

    Contains 15 Component(s)

    Survey Course: Understanding Population-Based Cancer Registries Course

    Introduction to Cancer Registries and Cancer Surveillance

    1. Public Health Surveillance Introduction & Fundamentals
    2. Establishing an Effective Population-based Cancer Registry System

    Registry Operations

    1. Casefinding
    2. Follow-up
    3. Data Editing
    4. Record consolidation
    5. Death clearance

    Registry Management

    1. Registry Development
    2. Data Quality and Completeness
    3. Ethics & confidentiality
    4. Data Management – IT resources

    Uses of Population-Based Registry Data

    1. Calculation and Assessment of Survival Rates
    2. Calculation and Assessment of Cancer Incidence
    3. Using Central Cancer Registry Data for Cancer Control and Cancer Research
  • RDU Webinar Series: Online Interactive Tool to Improve the Understanding of Survival Statistics

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/14/2017

    Background There are a variety of ways to quantify cancer survival with each measure having advantages and disadvantages. For example, relative/net survival is useful for making fair comparisons between population groups and over time, but is of less relevance to clinicians or patients. The differences between the various measures and how they should be interpreted has led to confusion among scientists, the media, health care professionals and patients. Purpose and methods. We have developed an online interactive tool to help improve the understanding of a variety of cancer survival measures and how these vary between patients. Its primary purpose is to function as an aid in the interpretation of a variety of commonly reported, important and more complex cancer survival measures that are available from fitting statistical models. The interpretation is facilitated through the use of dynamic interactive graphics available using an online interactive tool. The interactivity improves understanding of these measures and how survival or mortality may vary by age and sex. Routine measures of cancer survival are reported, such as net and all-cause survival. In addition, individualised estimates using crude probabilities are often more appropriate for patients or health care professionals. The results are presented in a variety of ways, including graphs, “people charts”, tables and descriptive text using natural frequencies. All results are updated immediately when using drag bars, drop-down menus or radio buttons. This immediate feedback together with the simple text descriptions leads to both better understanding of individual risk and the differences between the various measures. Results and conclusion The online tool is in final testing using English data for a range of cancer sites. The tool is available at www.interpret.le.ac.uk. We have plans to further develop the interactive tool by incorporating data from different countries and from statistical models that incorporate more disease characteristics (e.g. stage, grade and tumour size).

    Background

    There are a variety of ways to quantify cancer survival with each measure having advantages and disadvantages. For example, relative/net survival is useful for making fair comparisons between population groups and over time, but is of less relevance to clinicians or patients. The differences between the various measures and how they should be interpreted has led to confusion among scientists, the media, health care professionals and patients.

    Purpose and methods.

    We have developed an online interactive tool to help improve the understanding of a variety of cancer survival measures and how these vary between patients. Its primary purpose is to function as an aid in the interpretation of a variety of commonly reported, important and more complex cancer survival measures that are available from fitting statistical models. The interpretation is facilitated through the use of dynamic interactive graphics available using an online interactive tool. The interactivity improves understanding of these measures and how survival or mortality may vary by age and sex. Routine measures of cancer survival are reported, such as net and all-cause survival. In addition, individualised estimates using crude probabilities are often more appropriate for patients or health care professionals. The results are presented in a variety of ways, including graphs, “people charts”, tables and descriptive text using natural frequencies. All results are updated immediately when using drag bars, drop-down menus or radio buttons. This immediate feedback together with the simple text descriptions leads to both better understanding of individual risk and the differences between the various measures.

    Results and conclusion

    The online tool is in final testing using English data for a range of cancer sites. The tool is available at www.interpret.le.ac.uk.  We have plans to further develop the interactive tool by incorporating data from different countries and from statistical models that incorporate more disease characteristics (e.g. stage, grade and tumour size).  

    Paul C Lambert

    Paul C Lambert is a professor of Biostatistics working in the Biostatistics Research Group in the Department of Health Sciences at the University of Leicester, UK. He also part-time in the Biostatistics Group in the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

  • RDU Webinar Series: Identifying Target Areas for Colorectal Cancer Screening in Louisiana through Geospatial Analysis

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/10/2017

    The Louisiana Tumor Registry (LTR), along with the Louisiana Colorectal Cancer Roundtable and geospatial experts from NCI, Westat, and Temple University, collaborated to map colorectal cancer in Louisiana to support the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable’s “80% by 2018” initiative. The overall goal of the project was to use multiple data sources and geospatial analyses in order to identify the places and high-risk populations who may benefit the most from screening interventions. Through this webinar, the LTR will share its experiences with address cleaning and geospatial analyses, as well as present the resulting maps and implications for screening in Louisiana.

    The Louisiana Tumor Registry (LTR), along with the Louisiana Colorectal Cancer Roundtable and geospatial experts from NCI, Westat, and Temple University, collaborated to map colorectal cancer in Louisiana to support the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable’s “80% by 2018” initiative.  The overall goal of the project was to use multiple data sources and geospatial analyses in order to identify the places and high-risk populations who may benefit the most from screening interventions.  Through this webinar, the LTR will share its experiences with address cleaning and geospatial analyses, as well as present the resulting maps and implications for screening in Louisiana.

    Lauren S. Maniscalco, MPH

    Lauren Maniscalco has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and a Master of Public Health degree in Epidemiology from the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center School of Public Health.  She has been working for the Louisiana Tumor Registry since 2010 and is currently the Registry Liaison.

    Kevin Henry, PhD, MA

    Kevin Henry earned his PhD in Geography from McGill University and is currently an associate professor in the Department of Geography and Urban Studies at Temple University and a member of Fox Chase Cancer Center’s Cancer Prevention and Control Program.  He is a medical geographer focusing on the intersection between geography, public health, and epidemiology.

    Yong Yi, PhD, MS

    Yong Yi earned her PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Wyoming and a Master of Science degree in Statistics from Texas A&M University.  She has been working for the Louisiana Tumor Registry since 2016 and is currently the data manager.