Research and Data Use/Analytic Tools

  • Focus on Brain Tumors

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 11/04/2020

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

  • Social Determinants of Health Part 2

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/28/2020

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

  • Social Determinants of Health Part 1

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/21/2020

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

  • Focus On Survival

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/07/2020

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

  • Operations to Enhance Data Use and Research

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/30/2020

    This NAACCR Talk is based on a concurrent session that had been planned for the in person 2020 NAACCR Annual Conference.

  • Utility, Strengths, and Limitations of Cancer Registry Data For Firefighter Cancer Research

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/09/2020

    Research has demonstrated that firefighters are routinely exposed to many known and suspected human carcinogens including brominated flame retardants, PAHs, VOCs, benzene, asbestos and PFAS. While there is strong evidence that firefighters have higher risk for certain types of cancer compared to the general population, many details about cancer risk and risk factors remain poorly understood and subgroups of firefighters; including women, minorities, and volunteers, are understudied. Evidence for excess risk of cancer comes largely from historical cohort studies with limited exposure information and often lack data on important potential confounding factors, such as smoking and alcohol use. And because the cohorts are identified mainly through employment related records, these studies may be susceptible to downward bias from healthy worker effects. These studies also e exclude the majority of firefighters, who are volunteer not career firefighters. The aims of this session are to understand best practices for use of cancer registry data to this field of study, describe data access challenges and approaches, address approaches to improve exposure assessment and minimize impact of healthy worker effects, as well as become familiar with the development of the new National Firefighter Registry that aims to address the above gaps in information on understudied subgroups, such as woman and minorities, as well as volunteer and wildfire firefighters.

  • Revised Common Rule

    Contains 4 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/14/2020

    The revised Common Rule (effective January 21, 2019) is designed to strengthen protections for study participants and lighten administrative workloads for researchers and IRBs alike. These changes impact how research studies involving linkage with cancer registries, like those managed through NAACCR’s Virtual Pooled Registry, will be reviewed and processed across the country. NAACCR has partnered with the HHS Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) to share information on the revised Common Rule, such as when research involving registries requires IRB review and the impact of the changes on research covered by the revised regulations. Intended Audience: State/University IRBs and staff from central cancer registries involved in linking with research studies and releasing coded cancer data for matched cases.

  • Topics in AI/AN Cancer Surveillance

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/20/2020

    AI/AN people experience a different burden of cancer than their non-Native counterparts. This webinar will discuss current issues in AI/AN cancer surveillance, and present research that aims to describe and understand cancer among Indigenous peoples in the US and Canada.

  • A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating a Cancer Data Visualization

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 02/12/2020

    Cancer data is often available in reports, public data files, and slide decks, but these methods for disseminating data are not interactive, user-friendly, or visually appealing. While data visualizations are available from national cancer organizations, the Louisiana Tumor Registry (LTR) decided that creating a tool tailored to the needs of Louisiana would be a valuable contribution to the dissemination and use of its cancer registry data. Thus, the LTR collaborated with a data visualization specialist to create a user-friendly portal for Louisiana cancer data. The objective of this webinar is to describe the experience of developing an effective data visualization from the perspective of both the data visualization specialist and the state cancer registry.

  • Cancer in World Trade Center Rescue & Recovery Workers: Past Findings, Current Research and the Future

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/11/2019

    The collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) towers due to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 created an unprecedented mixture of hazardous materials including known and suspected carcinogens including, but not limited to, asbestos, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and dioxins. Three research centers that follow cohorts of rescue/recovery workers since the WTC disaster include: the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY); the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS); and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH). These centers have reported mostly non-significantly elevated cancer rates post-exposure to the WTC-site. Challenges of determining the causal relationship between WTC exposure and cancer in rescue/recovery workers include: lack of individual-level exposure data for specific chemicals, different exposure ascertainment methodologies for the three cohorts, loss to follow-up, inadequate power for cohort-specific analyses, demographic heterogeneity between the cohorts, and the lack of a viable comparison cohort.